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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
stalemated over how to avoid automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, come january. house speaker john boehner did speak by phone to president obama this week, and it was widely reported the two have agreed to negotiate directly with each other. but boehner said today, "there's no progress to report." >> four days ago, we offered a serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then there's been no counteroffer from the white house. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow-walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> sreenivasan: the president has insisted there will be no deal unless republicans agree to raise tax rates on the top 2%. republicans say the tax hikes would only hurt job creation. but in arlington, virginia, vice president biden said today's jobs report shows the economy is turning a corner, so it's critical to get a deal. >> there is a sense... there is a sense that if we can reach an- - act like adults and reach an agreement here on the fiscal cliff, the upside is much higher e
john boehner met privately at the white house. their first one-on-one session since the election. neither side gave any details about what was discussed. instead they issued identical statements saying that lines of communication remain open. at the same time the sunday talk shows highlighted a partial split in g.o.p. ranks over letting the president have higher tax rates on top earners. tennessee senator bob corker told fox news sunday that republicans should give ground on taxes and concentrate on long-term spending cuts. >> the focus then shifts to entitlements. maybe that puts us in a place where we actually can do something that really saves this nation. so there is a growing body -- i actually am beginning to believe that is the best route for us to take. >> woodruff: but on nbc, house majority whip kevin mccarthy countered that that approach is the wrong way to go. >> it doesn't solve the problem. the president is asking for higher rates, he's asking for more revenue. most economists agree the best way to get that is through closing special loopholes. when you close those
, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the republicans may present. but we are not going to simply cut our way to prosperity or to cut our way out of this deficit problem that we have. we're going to need more revenues. in order to do that, that starts with higher rates for the folks at the top. >> reporter: the president did say today he would consider lowering rates again for the top two percent next year as part of a broader tax overhaul. the house republican plan envisions $2.2 trillion in deficit reductions over the next decade. $800 billion would come from new revenues but with no hike in tax rates for top earners. instead the plan reles on .2 trillion in reduced spending including $600 billion from changes in medicare and medicaid. at the white house today, the president met with a bipartisan group of governors pressing his own plan for deficit reduction. that proposal, $1.6 trillion in revenue from ta
going up. >> woodruff: the president phoned house speaker john boehner yesterday, their first direct talk in almost a week. but today white house spokesman jay carney wouldn't share details of the call. >> we believe it's in the interest of achieving an agreement not to do that. >> reporter: treasury secretary timothy geithner said yesterday the white house was absolutely willing to go over the cliff if republicans held firm in their opposition to raising rates on the wealthy. but it was the administration's other demand-- to give the president authority over the nation's debt ceiling that roiled tempers on capitol hill. senate minority leader mitch mcconnell tried yesterday to force a vote on the issue, assuming republicans would prevail. >> look, the only way we ever cut spending around here is by using the debate over the debt limit to do it. now the president wants to remove that spur to cut altogether. it gets in the way of his spending plans. i assure you, it's not going to happen. >> reporter: but when majority leader harry reid took him up on the offer today, mcconnell backed
, congresswoman. we heard earlier today from john boehner and from jay carney at the white house, one saying spending cuts aren't serious coming from the house and the other saying the white house has put forth all the spending cuts that need to be put out. how do you prioritize what should be the focus here: spending cuts or raising revenue? >> most of us know it's got to be both. the fact is the president put out a really very sensible plan, middle-ground where it actually included spending cuts. we've already done a trillion dollars and we'll be doing another trillion dollars over a trillion dollars in cuts. that's $2 trillion. that's serious spending cuts over and above what we've done already. and of course we do think there has to be some revenue. then we're going to make sure we're doing the right kind of investments so we see economic growth. if it's not all three we're not going to get there. the math doesn't add up. this has been a real problem. if the republicans don't actually recognize the need for revenues and a balanced approach, then no matter how many spending cuts we do, th
've got some serious differences. >> woodruff: that downbeat assessment from house speaker john boehner came after he and president obama traded fresh offers this week. >> we spoke honestly and openly about the differences we face. but, the president's calling for $1.4 trillion worth of revenue. that cannot pass the house or the senate. >> woodruff: the president originally sought $1.6 trillion in revenue over 10 years, before lowering his target to $1.4 trillion. the money would come from raising rates on the top two percent of wage earners and curbing loopholes. boehner's counter was little changed-- $800 billion in revenues from closing loopholes and capping deductions, but no rate hikes. republicans have also demanded entitlement reform, and in a tuesday interview, the president would not rule out raising the medicare eligibility age by two years to 67. today, his white house spokesman, jay carney, summed up. >> he is willing to make tough choices and he has made clear and specified the spending cuts he is willing to make and he is willing to go further as part of a broader deficit
. >> thank you. >> woodruff: and to an on-the- ground look at the syrian war. john irvine of "independent television news" and his camera man sean swan traveled to the idlib region in the north west part of the country and filed this report. >> reporter: he's among the injured in the battle of control-- these rebel fighters had seized a strategic building only to have it brought down on top of them by tank shells. the wounded quickly ferried. dusty but unscathed. this rebel said just minor setback. the man had trouble hearing because his ears ringing from explosions. minutes later we knew how he felt. a syrian army tank in the valley had spotted our position. where we were ( explosions ) the rebels fired back with all they had which wasn't much. a.k.-47s. against tanks you can see why this is such a slog. battle of attrition. syrian army still has most of the fire power. it may be slow going but nature of battle has changed. it used to be syrian army that laid siege, but now the other way round. the rebels own the countryside-- these people have been bombed back to the dark ages. their ho
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)